A better word for surreal…?

I am going to say the most cliché thing in the entire world and I am ashamed to say it… but I don’t have the right words to put it in any other way. On January 6th my life was changed. Our group had the absolute privilege of attending a meeting at THE NEW YORK TIMES with the head of the graphic designs. It was so nerve wracking but also so incredibly thrilling at the same time to be in this huge building with insane windows over looking the streets of the city. I am going to say the most cliché thing in the entire world and I am ashamed to say it but I don’t have the right words to put it in any other way. On January 6th my life was changed. Our group had the absolute privilege of attending a meeting at THE NEW YORK TIMES with the head of the graphic designs. It was so nerve wracking but also so incredibly thrilling at the same time to be in this huge building with insane windows over looking the streets of the city.

The head of graphic design was very kind and welcoming to us and made us feel a little more at ease by cracking small jokes here and there. That most definitely eased the tension. He would ask us questions and I knew the answers to them but I was to nervous to blurt them out confidently in case I was completely wrong. That didn’t stop me from being completely awestruck by the fact that I was given this incredible opportunity to be here, at The New York Times, in the first place. The one thing the head of graphic design said that really stuck with me was his statement about getting a masters degree. He said you do not need a masters degree, and no one looks at that. What the companies look at is the skill and talent you have to offer to the company, no one cares what school you went to and if you got a masters degree.

The second place we had the privilege to attend was the Smoking Gun. This company could not be more polar opposite of The New York Times. Compared to the New York Times, the Smoking Gun is a “sliver” of the size. It’s very small, and only three people work for the company. Hearing William Bastone, the editor and founder of the company of 25 years, talk about this company gave me an entire different perspective of journalism and the media. He told stories about Russian hackers sending him confidential e-mails from high level political figures. It had finally hit me that things like that actually do happen and not just in movies and I was being told the stories first hand. Hearing about what the Smoking Gun does and how it requires reporters to be sneaky in their ways of getting their information gave me a hint of adrenaline rush and definitely sparked my interest in the field of investigative journalism.

My jaw was dropped to the floor from start to finish on the first day of our media impact trip. I couldn’t wrap my head around the fact that we have this incredible opportunity to talk to employees from these huge media organizations and hear them talk about what their organization does.

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  1. #1 by caseylmcclure on January 16, 2017 - 2:19 am

    Kristen, I feel like I am in the same boat as you. With each day I cannot believe how incredible this entire experience is. From massive organizations like The New York Times to much smaller ones like the Smoking Gun, our class as received amazing tips and ins in the industry. We get to experience many media outlets in ways most students don’t ever get to see. So just like you, my jaw is to the floor in the experiences we are having.

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