A Morning Adventure

This morning I decided to take a walk to the Museum of Women in the Arts. Unfortunately, due to technological problems with my phone, I couldn’t navigate my way there; so, I improvised.

Instead, I just walked until I came upon the National Geographic Society and briefly warmed up looking at one of their free exhibits on photography. The day was still young, I was decently layered-up, so I decided to attempt to find my way to the Lincoln Memorial. Using my natural gift of direction I zigged and zagged up street after street until I could finally make out the Washington Monument in the distance.
Upon reaching the monument I spent a little time surveying the World War II memorial, walked along the Reflecting Pool, which was mostly frozen over, and made my way up the steps leading to the giant statute commemorating the larger-than-life president, Abraham Lincoln.
Watching teenager followed by teenager take their selfies and leave, I made sure to take the time to read the second inaugural address and the Gettysburg Address  (or as one person called it, the four score speech). The memorial is incredible to take in and the words of President Lincoln on the north and south walls give weight to the importance the president had on our nation’s history.
By the time I was ready to leave, light snowflakes began to fall, adding to an already beautiful view of the Reflecting Pool and the Washington Monument. My phone couldn’t take a photo good enough to give the scene justice. I walked through the Vietnam Veteran’s Memorial and headed home.
On the way back, I passed the White House and briefly joined in on a rally happening in front of it. The people were protesting against corporations being labeled as people, the power of money in politics, and the apparent lack of democracy in the United States. I got a free sticker and sign and promptly left.

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I know, more famous and more important (and more real) people have given speeches on these steps.

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The man himself

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My free souvenirs I earned for being an activist for ten minutes.

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