The Associated Press and the privilege of site tours

This trip has taught me that I like tours. I like to see the real deal. What’s going on as it happens. Wow, I’m not even going to make it through the first paragraph without a sports analogy. It’s like getting explained the rules of football versus watching a live NFL playoff game as it happens, which is what I’m doing now in our hostel. There’s something exciting about watching a job or event happen live that’s intriguing to me.

Thus far on our trip, I think visiting The Associated Press has probably been my favorite site, in large part because of their gracious hospitality. They allowed us to sit in on a portion of their morning news meeting, which was a kind of “you have to be there to understand it” moment.  It wouldn’t have been the same had it been explained to us in a conference room instead of seeing it happen live. The AP also let us take photos and videos as we pleased outside of the news meeting, and gave us a tour around one of their operating floors.

We saw The AP, happening in front of our eyes. I mean, it was a newsroom for the most part, not exactly the visual appeal of a professional sports game or music concert, but it was still very cool to see and I’m very thankful to The AP for letting us tour their building.

Don’t get me wrong, I’ve been excited and interested to visit each and every site that have allowed us an inside look at their organizations. But I have noticed that most times we are confined to a conference room, which is completely understandable given the fact that the media personnel we meet with have busy schedules, and just taking an hour of their time to talk to us is an act of kindness I think we are all thankful for. At the conference room meetings, I have learned a lot and enjoyed my time. But in the rare event we get an extended look at the facilities, such as at The AP or Bloomberg News, I’ve been fascinated with seeing real work happening in real time as we walk around the facility.

 

A PicStitch of three broadcast groups (ABC, NBC and another) I saw today in DC setting up for The Inauguration at the Newseum.

A PicStitch of three broadcast groups (ABC, NBC and another) I saw today in DC setting up for The Inauguration at The Newseum.

Like Remi highlighted in her post, it’s a fun and eye-opening experience to get a look behind the scenes when the focus is typically on the end product or on-screen production. I think I have a particular interest for learning what’s going on behind the scenes. I keep stopping and taking pictures of the television networks setting up their news studios in and around The White House in preparation for The Inauguration tomorrow. Maybe that’s what I’d like to do some day, work on a game day production crew for sporting events as a behind-the-scenes employee for some part of the production.

But for now, I’m content to sit here and watch the end product on television. This trip has been great. It’s hard to believe that a little over 24 hours ago, I was in New York, exploring Times Square, the Brooklyn Bridge, Rockefeller Center, and more. What a great experience. I was even forced to walk through a couple of art museums. Torture.

Now I’m sitting here in the D.C. hostel forcing Chrissy to watch football while I write my blog post. Awesome.

 

 

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  1. #1 by chrissyroach on January 20, 2013 - 11:18 pm

    Two things: Nice PicStitch. Nice last two paragraphs.

  2. #2 by knaten on January 21, 2013 - 1:58 am

    I completely agree Andrew! There really is something about getting to see all of these sites up close and personal that makes it such a better learning experience than just sitting in a classroom and hearing about what these people do. Before this trip I though I understood a fair extent of how a news team functioned… but this trip has been a huge wake up call for me, showing me that there really is just so much MORE. Being a football fan myself I loved your analogy… its so true, everything we are seeing on this trip just can’t be explained as well as it can be experienced!

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